DUI: Not Just a Risk to Yourself

Driving under the influence of alcohol, also shortened as DUI, is an offense wherever you go in the United States. If you are on the wheel with a blood alcohol content of 0.08% or more, you are already considered driving while intoxicated. In fact, even if you have blood alcohol content that is lower, you can still become questionable if you show signs of intoxication, like poor body coordination and bloodshot eyes.

DUI is illegal because the authorities clearly know how dangerous it can be.

Risk on yourself

The first victim of DUI is you. The moment you decide to drive while drunk, you are already putting yourself at risk of being involved in a car accident. This is because of the physical and psychological effects of alcohol on your body, as they can limit your driving skills.

Aside from poor body coordination, you will have poor traffic comprehension, slow reaction time, and an increased tendency to do other reckless driving stunts, like speeding.

Because of these effects, car accidents caused by DUI are often violent and life-threatening. The property damage and the heavy traffic you create should also not be ignored.

Risk on others

If you are caught driving under the influence with a child passenger, the charges against you may become worse. But still, you should consider yourself lucky if that is the only bad thing that has happened.

It could be worse. You can get into an accident and bring other people with you, including passengers, other drivers on the road, and even unsuspecting pedestrians. According to the website of Brunkenhoefer P.C., those who are responsible for DUI accidents may be held accountable for compensation to their victims.

In other words, a DUI accident can truly be a financially devastating experience, in the form of fines, hospital bills, lost wages for missing time at work due to injury, attorney and court fees, and compensatory fees for the victims you have involved in your reckless endeavor.

It can also be said that money is not the worst damage you can sustain, because nothing is worse than injury and death, especially if they are sustained by an innocent party.

The Complexity of T-Bone Collisions

The Complexity of T-Bone Collisions

There are various kinds of car accidents, such as head-on collisions, rear-end collisions, and rollovers. But one of the most overlooked yet equally dangerous kinds is T-bone collisions. In fact, it is so overlooked that many people don’t even know what it is. A T-bone collision occurs when the front end of a vehicle hits the side of another, forming a letter “T,” hence the name.

What makes T-bone collisions dangerous is the fact that, often, the accidents are chain reactions. The vehicle that gets T-boned may receive enough force for it to crash to nearby obstacles, such as other vehicles, utility poles, street lights, and fire hydrants. It may even turnover and eject its occupants. The vehicle that causes the T-bone accident may also inflict enough force on itself that it goes over the initial collision area and wreak further havoc.

T-bone collisions are even more tragic when a negligent or reckless party has caused it. This is because an innocent person is likely hurt and properties are likely damaged just because of somebody else’s actions. According to the website of this Philadelphia accident lawyer, those who have been victims of such instances may have legal options, which is good news.

T-bone accidents typically occur because of right-of-way problems. For example, a vehicle has been diligently crossing the intersection with a green light when a vehicle from the adjacent road suddenly enters the intersection with a red light, resulting into a T-bone collision.

The diligent driver, the one who gets his vehicle T-boned, is clearly at a disadvantage. First, he didn’t do anything wrong and was just following traffic rules. Second, being T-boned puts him at risk of crashing on nearby obstacles, such as those that have been mentioned earlier.

It is not always about running through red lights and blowing stop signs, because even seemingly innocent behaviors such as turning left may put that vehicle’s occupants at risk of getting T-boned by vehicles from oncoming traffic. In these instances, the person who gets T-boned is the one who has been negligent.

Whoever is at fault, it doesn’t change the fact that there will be medical bills, repair costs, and possibly lost wages for losing time at work because of injury.